Pervez Musharraf is a man who will not ‘fade away’. The former Pakistan president was planning to quit public life and live in peace five years after the 2008 elections, but the return of former prime ministers Benazir Bhutto, which Musharraf says was in violation of his agreement with her, and Nawaz Sharif to Pakistan “created turmoil”.

Today, the 67-year-old retired general promises that he “will be back” in his homeland to contest the 2013 elections, tackle “the political and economic turmoil” and fight the terrorism threat.

A General with a 'rescue' plan

Former Pakistan president promises that he “will be back” in his homeland to contest the 2013 elections


Pervez Musharraf is a man who will not ‘fade away’. The former Pakistan president was planning to quit public life and live in peace five years after the 2008 elections, but the return of former prime ministers Benazir Bhutto, which Musharraf says was in violation of his agreement with her, and Nawaz Sharif to Pakistan “created turmoil”.

Today, the 67-year-old retired general promises that he “will be back” in his homeland to contest the 2013 elections, tackle “the political and economic turmoil” and fight the terrorism threat.

“I have a plan,” he told Gulf News in a one-hour conversation at his Dubai home, overlooking the Burj Khalifa, the world’s tallest building. A key part of that plan is to ‘modify” the government system “if the people agree.”

Musharraf explained that “in my personal opinion, presidential system with checks and balances is good for Pakistan.”

Critics say Musharraf has to be realistic. They argue that he doesn’t have the grassroots support to carry him back to power. But he contends that with the help of his newly launched All Pakistan Muslim League (APML) party he “provides a political alternative to be seen by the people of Pakistan and the international community [as the only way] to save Pakistan.”

With the determination of a military officer who is seemingly trying hard to appear like a politician, Musharraf adds: “If I can do that, that is the salvation of Pakistan and I will give it a good try.”

But despite his nine years in the presidential office, Musharraf retains the tone of an army general although he put on an impressive show of remembering all the numbers that matter; the national debt, the capacity and the actual production of electricity, the unemployment figures and other data he used in the interview to stress that Pakistan was drowning in systematic corruption and administrative mismanagement.

Musharraf also spoke about Sharif’s lack of political insight and inability to govern and said it will be “unfortunate” for the country and people if Sharif comes to power again. And despite acknowledging his good relations with the United States, the general, sounding like a politician again, strongly criticises US drone attacks saying that the action is creating more hatred in Pakistan. But he quickly returns to his military school of thought as he advocates an Afghan government led by the majority Pashtuns.
“The Pashtuns have always ruled that country.” They will not accept a government run by others, he stressed.

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Gulf News
http://gulfnews.com/news/world/pakis...-plan-1.739855