The U.N. commission, which looked into the facts and circumstance of the 2007 assassination of Mohtarma Benazir Bhutto has held General(R) Pervez Musharraf's government responsible for the killings of former premier Benazir Bhutto. The details of the report states that the security provided to her by the government was inadequate and the report further suggest that her personal security provided by PPP was inadequate from preventing the tragedy to take place.

The UN Commission, tasked with ascertaining facts behind December 27, 2007 assassination of Shaheed Mohtarma Benazir Bhutto, said in its report that the responsibility for security of the prime minister rested primarily with the then federal government, the government of Punjab and Rawalpindi Police and found that the federal government failed to provide effective protection to the popular leader.The head of the commission said none of the three took necessary measure to respond to the extraoridnary risks facing the former prime minister but said it is for the Pakistani authorities to hold anyone responsible.
“We cannot accuse or absolve anyone. That is the task of Pakistani authorities,” head of the commission, Ambassador Heraldo Munoz of Chile, told a news conference, while releasing the report.

“Responsibility for Bhutto’s security on the day of her assassination rested with the federal Government, the government of Punjab and the Rawalpindi District Police. None of these entities took necessary measures to respond to the extraordinary, fresh and urgent security risks that they knew she faced,” the Commission said in its findings.
“The federal Government under General Musharraf, although fully aware of, and tracking, the serious threats to Bhutto’s security, did little more than pass on those threats to her and provincial authorities and were not proactive in neutralizing them or ensuring that the security provided was commensurate to the threats.
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“The federal Government failed in its primary responsibility to provide effective protection to Ms Bhutto on her return to Pakistan.”
“The federal Government lacked a comprehensive security plan for Ms Bhutto, relying instead on provincial authorities, but then failed to issue to them the necessary instructions. Particularly inexcusable was the Government’s failure to direct provincial authorities to provide Ms Bhutto the same stringent and specific security measures it ordered on 22 October 2007 for two other former prime ministers who belonged to the main political party supporting General Musharraf. This discriminatory treatment is profoundly troubling given the devastating attempt on her life only three days earlier and the specific threats against her which were being tracked by the ISI.”
The three-member commission, which undertook several visits to Pakistan and interviewed a number of people, found that the “federal Government lacked a comprehensive security plan for Ms Bhutto, relying instead on provincial authorities, but then failed to issue to them the necessary instructions.” “Particularly inexcusable was the Government’s failure to direct provincial authorities to provide Ms Bhutto the same stringent and specific security measures it ordered on 22 October 2007 for two other former prime ministers who belonged to the main political party supporting General Musharraf.” Ms Bhutto’s assassination on 27 December 2007 could have been prevented if the Rawalpindi District Police had taken adequate security measures. The security arrangements for Ms Bhutto by the Rawalpindi District Police were ineffective and insufficient. The police’s security plan, as written, was flawed, containing insufficient focus on Ms Bhutto’s protection and focusing instead on the deployment of police for crowd control purposes,” it said.

The Commission is persuaded that the Rawalpindi police chief, CPO Saud Aziz, did not act independently of higher authorities, either in the decision to hose down the crime scene or to impede the post-mortem examination.

It also found that the Government press conference conducted by Brigadier Cheema on 28 December 2007, the day after the assassination, was ordered by General Musharraf. “The Government’s assertion that Ms Bhutto’s death was caused when she hit her head on the lever of her vehicle’s escape hatch and that Baitullah Mehsud and Al-Qaida were responsible for the suicide bomber were made well before any proper investigation had been initiated. This action preempted, prejudiced and hindered the subsequent investigation.”

An unequivocal determination as to the cause and means of Bhutto’s death would have required an autopsy. The Commission has uncovered no new evidence to suggest a gunshot injury to Bhutto. Diplomats pointed out that the purpose of the inquiry was to establish the facts and circumstances around Bhutto’s slaying and was not meant to identify the culprits.
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